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Wednesday, February 15, 2006

Club Gitmo Oh So Special

In this environment of people seeking to forcibly rip all religion out of all government entities there is one shining beacon of . . . bigotry.

In Guantanamo Bay Cuba, the place where numerous terrorists are currently being held in detainment, the government is going to great lengths to accommodate Islam. At taxpayer expense these vile swine are each given their own personal copies of the Koran, prayer rugs, beads, and clothing that fits in with Islamic law. On the surface this is nothing more than the humane, respectful treatment these people don’t deserve, but are being given anyway.

Under the surface is a different story entirely.

In US prisons inmates are not given religious articles at taxpayer expense. Christians are not given individual government issue Bibles and Crucifixes, and Jews do not get individual government issue Torahs, Talmuds, and prayer caps.

In Schools Teachers are being prevented from displaying anything that demonstrates Christianity, like wearing cross pendants, but Muslim religious symbol go unbothered. There are numerous cases where the Bible has been removed from school libraries, but the Koran was left alone. We cannot teach Christianity, but schools are allowed to have their students role play as Muslims. All of this is done under the watchful eye of the ACLU and Americans United for the Separation of Church and State.

This bespeaks of a specific anti-Christian bias among the “anti-establishment crowd” that is actually quite disturbing. It would not be so disturbing if all religions were treated equally, and with equal attempts at suppression. However, for some reason Christianity is being specifically targeted for the most virulent acts of hatred and suppression.

In my debates with Atheists the common reason given for this is that Christianity is the most common Religion in America, and, as such, deserves the most attention. Okay, but Islam is getting no attention at all that I know of, and it is Muslims, not Christians who are busy murdering people in the name of God. Based on this alone it would seem that Atheists, many of whom claim that religion is itself an evil thing, would be especially attentive to the open government promotion of the single most violent religion in the world today. They are not.

So, if wiping out the “evil” of religion is such a motivator, why is the one religion that is doing the most evil in the world being catered to this way?

I cannot answer this question. It makes no sense and holds no logic that this should be so.

I say we treat Islam just like every other religion. Ban it from the classroom. Force Muslim prisoners to get their religious accoutrements from private donors or purchase them on their own. Provide one or two copies of the Koran in the prison library, and none in school libraries. Assault Ramadan and its symbols the way Christmas is assaulted. Be equal. Don’t cater to terrorists and islamofascists.

Perhaps Atheists are afraid of Muslims. They have seen the way those who oppose Islam are murdered without regard worldwide and are afraid. Perhaps they target Christianity more out of cowardice, knowing they are safe from both persecution and murder by doing so while ignoring Islam.

This speaks worlds of the love, patience, and tolerance of Christians, and also of the violence and hatred of Muslims.

23 Comments:

  • This is a wonderful post, Daniel. I think it's one of your best. Maybe not, but it's my opinion anyway. It's extremely well-written and thought out, as your posts always are. I guess I like this one so much because I'm so frustrated with the hypocricy that exists, seemingly everywhere. :)

    By Blogger Gayle, at 10:07 AM  

  • Daniel,

    Isn’t Guantanamo Bay a special case considered to be outside the US legal system, mainly so that the inmates can be detained indefinitely without trial? I don’t think you can use Gitmo as an example, but then go on to talk about general cases like prisons and schools inside the US.

    In US prisons (those inside the legal system), are Muslims treated specially? Do they have Qur’ans, prayer rugs, beads and clothing that fits in with Islamic law provided at taxpayers’ expense?

    Daniel: There are numerous cases where the Bible has been removed from school libraries, but the Koran was left alone. We cannot teach Christianity, but schools are allowed to have their students role play as Muslims.

    Can you please cite some cases where Bibles have been removed from school libraries, but the Qur’an was left alone. Religious education (of any religion) is forbidden in US public schools, except for neutral academic purposes such as history or social studies. And are you saying that role playing is indoctrinating children into Islam?

    Daniel: I say we treat Islam just like every other religion. Ban it from the classroom. Force Muslim prisoners to get their religious accoutrements from private donors or purchase them on their own. Provide one or two copies of the Koran in the prison library, and none in school libraries. Assault Ramadan and its symbols the way Christmas is assaulted. Be equal.

    Isn’t this the way it is now? Isn’t Islamic religious education forbidden in public schools? Don’t Muslim prisoners in US prisons have to obtain religious trappings on their own? As an aside, I wonder how many Muslims in US prisons openly practice their religion, given that Christians make up an even higher percentage of the prison population than they do in the population outside prison. How many copies of the Qur’an are there in prison and school libraries, typically? Aren’t people allowed to ignore Ramadan and refuse to celebrate it?

    By Anonymous cjb, at 12:25 PM  

  • hey daniel! can you dig up something on how ohio's education group said schools can't even mention intelligent design in class EVER!!

    By Blogger Libby, at 12:27 PM  

  • I’ve just done some further reading and I take back what I said about Islam in prisons. It appears that there is an acceptance of Islam in prisons and, in fact, some prisoners are converting to Islam while in prison. However, I still don’t think that their religious trappings are provided at taxpayers’ expense, unless you can show me otherwise.

    By Anonymous cjb, at 12:46 PM  

  • CJB,
    1: Is Guantanamo bay a federal institution or isn't it?

    2: I heard about the cases I am citing through the American Center for Law and Justice and also from the Cristian Law Association.

    3: If it were that way this post would not have needed to be written.

    By Blogger Daniel Levesque, at 3:01 PM  

  • Please look at the story I just posted. Please research and spread the word.

    By Blogger Rick's Corner, at 3:15 PM  

  • Daniel: 1: Is Guantanamo bay a federal institution or isn't it?

    Yes it is, but it is a single special case of an offshore military prison housing predominantly Muslim prisoners. You mention it in the first paragraph of your post, but then go on to speak about prisons and schools in the US in general as though what goes on in Gitmo somehow applies across the board. I don’t think it does. I’ll ask again: are Muslim prisoners in US prisons (other than Gitmo) given their religious paraphernalia by the government at taxpayers’ expense?

    Daniel: 2: I heard about the cases I am citing through the American Center for Law and Justice and also from the Cristian Law Association.

    I’m sorry, but I’ve searched both the ACLJ and Christian Law for cases where the Bible has been removed from school libraries and I cannot find any mention of it. Could you please provide some evidence to back up your claim.

    Daniel: 3: If it were that way this post would not have needed to be written.

    Okay, so then please answer these questions and provide evidence to support your claims.

    1. Is Islamic religious education forbidden in public schools: yes or no?

    2. Do Muslim prisoners in mainland US prisons have to obtain their religious paraphernalia on their own: yes or no?

    3. Are non-Muslim people in the US allowed to ignore Ramadan and refuse to celebrate it: yes or no?

    4. Have Bibles been removed from school libraries while copies of the Qur’an have been left on the shelves: yes or no?

    By Anonymous cjb, at 6:18 PM  

  • CJB

    1: In word, yes. In deed, no.

    2: Allow me to check with the local prison and get back to you.

    3: Yes, as it is for any holidy. no one is forced to celebrate.

    4: Yes.

    Regarding your research into the removal of the Bible from a school library where the Koran was allowed to remain, did you go back far enough? If I recall correctly the specific case I am citing was in 1997 or 1996. At the time it was mentioned as a singular example of a trend that was being fought.

    By Blogger Daniel Levesque, at 7:24 PM  

  • Daniel,

    Once again you provide no evidence to back up your claims.

    1. Please provide some evidence that shows that Islamic religious education is taking place in public schools. I find it very difficult to believe that this is true. Your vague statement about role playing is not evidence. In Roberts v. Madigan (see below), the court took pains to point out that there is a difference between teaching religion and teaching about religion. I think you are confusing the two.

    2. Anecdotes from the staff or inmates at one prison could hardly be considered evidence. Show us some government documents supporting your claim.

    3. If Ramadan is not imposed upon us and we are free to ignore it, then we don’t need to assault it. What’s your problem?

    4. I used the search function on both sites and couldn’t find anything. I’ve since tried Google and I’ve found many sites indicating that it is not okay to remove the Bible from school libraries. They all cite one case, Roberts v. Madigan (1990), in which a Bible was removed from a school library by a principal (Madigan) over-reacting to a parent’s complaint about a teacher (Roberts). I’m having difficulty finding the actual case, but from various descriptions of it, I’ve found that the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that a Bible in the school library did not violate the Establishment Clause and ordered Madigan to replace it. However, the court also ruled that Roberts must remove two religious books The Bible in Pictures and The Story of Jesus from bookshelves in the classroom, Roberts must not read the Bible silently in the classroom during school hours and he must not leave the Bible in plain sight on his desk.

    So, all in all, you haven’t provided any evidence to support your claims and there is evidence to the contrary. Your failure to provide evidence to support your claims seems to be a common thread running through many of your posts. I hope you do better in your posts on evolution.

    By Anonymous cjb, at 12:52 AM  

  • Club Gitmo here I come!

    By Blogger Neo-Con Tastic, at 8:06 AM  

  • CJB,

    In your assertions regarding Ramadan you have stated why you are desiring that we leave it be while your Atheist brethren are busy assaulting the symbols of Christmas.

    This is exactly the kind of thing I am talking about when I say that Islam is getting a pass while Christianity is asaulted on all sides.

    By Blogger Daniel Levesque, at 8:55 AM  

  • Well, I have been waitng and it has not happened.

    I have been waiting for CJB to rescind his "Gitmo is a special case" argument, and after several days it ha snot happened.

    It's rather sad, but I must thankyou, CJB, for proving my case for me. You have demonstrated an utter lack of concern for the federal sponsorship of a religion within a federal instituion in regards to Gitmo, and even defended the practice of Ramadan but you have assaulted Christioanity on this blog in the past without mercy. You have voiced your support for stripping Christianity from public life. You have even voice support for taking a satement as innocuous as "Under God" out of the US Pledge of Alegiance. Yet you have supported the government sponsoship of Islam right here.

    It's sad really. There are times when I hate being right.

    By Blogger Daniel Levesque, at 8:04 AM  

  • Daniel,

    You seem to misunderstand my position on religion so let me clarify it for you. I think of religion as a mental crutch that provides emotional support to people who find some questions or events too difficult or too frightening to face on their own. To me, it is nothing more than a bunch of worthless platitudes, fairy tales and lies that does more harm than good and I would prefer it if people could see it for what it is and discard it. However, I accept that there will always be some people who need religion so I’m resigned to the thought that it is probably here to stay.

    What I object to—and this is what I want you to understand—is having religion forced in any way on those who don’t need it or want it. This is particularly objectionable when it is an authority that is forcing it on people. If you understand this, then my responses may make more sense to you. So in light of this, let me correct your most recent misunderstandings.

    I would prefer it if the prisoners in Gitmo did not have their religious paraphernalia provided to them, any more than it is in mainland prisons. For instance, one or two copies of the Qur’an in the prison library would suffice. I can see why the Government chose to behave as they did, but I don’t think that they were forcing the Qur’an or Islam on prisoners who didn’t want it. I think they were trying to give the impression that they were considerate of the Muslim prisoners’ needs in an effort to deflect criticism from other more questionable practices going on inside the prison. I would prefer it if the Gitmo prison was shut down and the prisoners were transferred to mainland prisons where their treatment could come under closer scrutiny.

    I am not defending the celebration of Ramadan or desiring that you leave it be; I am indifferent to it. It isn’t being forced upon us so I am unconcerned. In fact, I am also indifferent to Christmas celebrations other than I feel that they are overly commercial. Actually, Christmas seems to me to be more commercial than religious these days. You may not have noticed this, but I didn’t post a single response to your Happy Holidays or Merry Christmas posts in December.

    I am advocating stripping Christianity from public life if the Government is endorsing it. Again, I object to any authority trying to force religion upon those who don’t want it. The Pledge of Allegiance is a case in point. I object to non-Christian students being forced to say ‘under God’ either by peer pressure or by the Government (in the form of the public school system). The students are put in a position where they cannot ignore the fact that they are expected to believe in God.

    Again, I don’t think the Government is forcing Islam on prisoners who don’t want it, in Gitmo or anywhere else. My original objection to your using Gitmo as an example in your post was your fallacious extrapolation from a specialised case to all prisons and schools.

    And you still haven’t provided any evidence to back up your claims.

    By Anonymous cjb, at 1:49 PM  

  • CJB makes my point about organised religion better than I could: "I think of religion as a mental crutch that provides emotional support to people who find some questions or events too difficult or too frightening to face on their own."

    While I don't hate religion I just hate all the bullshit that gets attached to it. It's a lifestyle choice, after all. If you want to believe any old books then that's your right and that's cool... but when it's forced down other people's throats, used to justify bigotry, causes wars or makes zealots burn down embassys because of blasphemous cartoons it reminds me of why it is, to me, an outdated concept.

    I suppose I am more about being a good person because it's the right thing to do rather than living my life according to one group of folks' interpretation of a belief system.

    A few Bibles in a jail / school library is no big deal. Nor is a few Korans. But having only one kind of Holy Book there is a bit stupid. There's a range of religions to choose from, after all.

    By Blogger DanProject76, at 3:07 AM  

  • CJb,

    I understand your positon on religion very well. You have made it amply clear over the couse of the last few months. I would need to be retarded to miss it.

    What I was pointing out was that rather than assault the government sponsorship of religion being displayed by providing the terrorists in Gitmo with all of their required religious paraphanelia using YOUR tax dollars, you defended it as a special case. At the same time you have lashed out against similar and lesser government actions involving Christianity here on the mainland.

    Also, I would think tha t a man who is as sensitive to religion n governement as you would have heard about the schools that started teaching about Islam and having their students role play as Muslims. It started after 9/11 as a response to try to teach kids not to blame Muslims for the terorists., but it included a great deal of religious instruction in the muslim faith. It was all over both Cristian, and conservative news outlets in 2003-2004, and to a lesser degree to this day. Of course, it was NOT news to the lieral news media since they are sympathetic to Islam for some irrational reason.

    Oh yeah, and just last Ramadan, it was forced on the students in one school in, I want to say say Illinois but I don't quie remember, whe students in one class were given an official scholl asignment for a grade where tey were to observe the holiday for a time and write an essay about it. Are you saying that Atheists never caught wind of this?

    By Blogger Daniel Levesque, at 9:40 AM  

  • Daniel: you defended it as a special case.

    I wasn’t defending Gitmo as a special case. I’ve just told you that I would prefer that the Government didn’t treat the Gitmo prisoners differently from mainland prisoners. I was pointing out that Gitmo is a special case and because of that, you can’t use it as representative of US prisons in general.

    Daniel: the schools that started teaching about Islam and having their students role play as Muslims.

    As I suspected, you are confusing ‘teaching about a religion’ with ‘teaching a religion’. Are the schools telling the students that they should become Muslims and believe in Allah? I doubt it. I think it is more likely they are providing information to students in the hope that they won’t simply become ignorant, hateful bigots. Why would the Christian and conservative groups be against this?

    Daniel: Oh yeah, and just last Ramadan, it was forced on the students in one school…where tey were to observe the holiday for a time and write an essay about it.

    Oh come on, “forced”? And when you say “for a time”, how long are we talking about, one day, two days or the entire month? This sounds to me the same as asking the children to fast ‘for a time’ so they can gain an appreciation of what it is like to be a starving, third-world child or carrying an egg around without damaging it ‘for a time’ to give them an inkling of how much effort is involved in caring for a baby. Then they write an essay about it. The point is to teach children about the realities of life and how others live. It isn’t teaching them to become Muslims, to move to a third-world country or to become pregnant.

    By Anonymous cjb, at 3:21 PM  

  • CJB,

    "Daniel: you defended it as a special case. . .I wasn’t defending Gitmo as a special case. . . I was pointing out that Gitmo is a special case . . ."

    Ahem, I do believe that is called contradicting oneself.

    "As I suspected, you are confusing ‘teaching about a religion’ with ‘teaching a religion’."

    So you would perfectly okay with it if your local schools were teaching about Christianity and having every student in the class engage in specificaly Christian behavior regardless of religious or personal conflicts? Does this mean you are cool with having teachers give Holy communion and setting up a confesional in the classroom and requiring the students to partake of each?


    "This sounds to me the same as asking the children to fast ‘for a time’ so they can gain an appreciation of what it is like to be a starving, third-world child"

    And yet, niether of those is a religious activity, observing Ramadan is. Maybe we should mandate fasting on Good Friday for a public School students so they can know what it is like to be a Catholic one day out of the year. But then, you yourself have blasted such things in the past.

    Quit contradicting yourself in order to defend Islam. Either you are experiencing problems with your interal logic, or you have a specific hatred of Christianity, and ONLY Christianity, which would make you less of an Atheist, and more of a simple bigot.

    You are still proving my point for me, by the way.

    By Blogger Daniel Levesque, at 7:19 PM  

  • Daniel,

    I’ll try one last time to explain it to you.

    Defending something means protecting it from attack or justifying it. I’m not doing that with Islam in Gitmo or anywhere else. I’m saying I disagree with giving Muslim prisoners special privileges in Gitmo or anywhere else. When I called Gitmo a special case, I was saying that it is unique and shouldn’t be used as an example of what goes on in prisons across the US. You still haven’t offered any evidence that Muslim prisoners are given special treatment in any mainland prisons. And you’ve still failed to provide evidence to back up any of the other claims you made. I’m getting really tired of your constant assertions without any evidence to support them. Then, when I challenge you on them, you change the subject, focus on minutiæ or curiously fail to comprehend what I’m saying.

    Daniel: So you would perfectly okay with it if your local schools were teaching about Christianity

    Yes, if it is limited to teaching about Christianity and not teaching Christianity or religious indoctrination.

    Daniel: Does this mean you are cool with having teachers give Holy communion and setting up a confesional in the classroom and requiring the students to partake of each?

    What a ridiculous straw man. This is not teaching about Christianity, this is outright proselytising.

    Daniel: Maybe we should mandate fasting on Good Friday for a public School students so they can know what it is like to be a Catholic one day out of the year.

    This is another ridiculous straw man. Stop gibbering and provide some evidence to support your original claims.

    By Anonymous cjb, at 11:43 PM  

  • Great post! And did you know you aren't even allowed to send Christian material to troops serving overseas in Muslim countries? Something's seriously messed up here.

    By Blogger Rebekah, at 7:36 AM  

  • CJB,

    Straw man? Let's review.

    "Daniel: Does this mean you are cool with having teachers give Holy communion and setting up a confesional in the classroom and requiring the students to partake of each?

    CJB: What a ridiculous straw man. This is not teaching about Christianity, this is outright proselytising.

    Daniel: Maybe we should mandate fasting on Good Friday for a public School students so they can know what it is like to be a Catholic one day out of the year.

    CHB: This is another ridiculous straw man. Stop gibbering and provide some evidence to support your original claims."

    And prior to that . . .

    "Daniel: Oh yeah, and just last Ramadan, it was forced on the students in one school…where tey were to observe the holiday for a time and write an essay about it.

    CJB: Oh come on, “forced”? And when you say “for a time”, how long are we talking about, one day, two days or the entire month? This sounds to me the same as asking the children to fast ‘for a time’ so they can gain an appreciation of what it is like to be a starving, third-world child or carrying an egg around without damaging it ‘for a time’ to give them an inkling of how much effort is involved in caring for a baby. Then they write an essay about it. The point is to teach children about the realities of life and how others live. It isn’t teaching them to become Muslims, to move to a third-world country or to become pregnant."

    Another self-contradiction. When it's forcing student's to observe Islamic practices, even for a day or two it's, apparently, cultural education to increase understanding, when it is Christianity in the place of Islam it is prosteletizing.

    Furthermore, I did not say Muslims in Mainland prisons were given all the same religious items as the terrorists in Gitmo. I said that if the government is going to do such a thing for some of the worst people in the world then it needs to do the same for EVERY prisoner, or it needs to quit doig it for the terrorists.

    Shoot, right now the ACLJ is fighting a case where the US Air Force has banned Christian Chaplains from praying specifically to the Christian God or closing out prayers in the name of Jesus, as is the constitutionally protected practice of all Christians, unless it is at sunday worship service. This while the military bends over backward to accomidate Muslim terrorists in Gitmo. Outrageous!

    Finally, I understans perfectlt well whatyou are saying, and it is not minutae or semantics to point out the way that you have been presnting your argument is self-contradictory. It is valuable debate skill that is learned from the logic discipline of philosophy, and you will find it used constantly in debate of all sorts. Rather than griping about me pointing it you would be better served to modify your arguments.

    Now, for your future reference, if you want to know where any news items I talk about come from you find it through one of these sources: Fox News, conservative talk radio, The Weekly Standard, Newsweek, Time Magazine, National Review, Israel My Glory, The Bible In The News Report, the ACLJ, The CLA, The occasional blog (which I typicaly name in the article), Or a book (which I also typically name), and sometimes college.

    Not all of the information I use is from recent news. I frequently tie recent events in with old stories and events to demonstrate trends and changes. Fortunately, my information sources haven't really changed.

    By Blogger Daniel Levesque, at 10:03 AM  

  • Daniel,

    Okay, I’ve given up trying to make you understand what I’m saying. Let’s just stick to the evidence, which you have so far failed to provide.

    You said: There are numerous cases where the Bible has been removed from school libraries, but the Koran was left alone.

    If there were numerous cases, then I would have thought you would have no trouble citing some. I asked you to cite some cases and you said this:

    I heard about the cases I am citing through the American Center for Law and Justice and also from the Cristian Law Association.

    Telling me where you think you heard about them is not citing cases. As far as I can tell, there is no mention of any such cases at either of these sites. I eventually dug up a case myself, but it tended to contradict your assertion.

    I’ve repeatedly asked you to provide evidence to support your various assertions, in this post and others, but so far, you haven’t produced any. Now you seem to think that making a generic statement about the Christian and right-wing web sites you read is the same as providing evidence. This would be like a scientist providing a general list of the journals he reads as evidence supporting his research or a witness in a trial saying that she reads the newspapers when asked to provide evidence supporting her testimony.

    When you eventually get around to making your posts on evolution, telling us that you’ve read Icons of Evolution or browsed some Christian web sites is not going to cut it as evidence.

    Until you do better than this, I doubt that any thinking person will believe you.

    By Anonymous cjb, at 3:42 PM  

  • CJB,

    I do not, and I will not spend my life taking notes of where I read everything I learn just to satisfy your demand that I point you to the document, page, and date of everything I write in this blog. Unlikr the people who actually get paid to do this I do not have my own research team giving me the cliff notes and original source of everything i write about.

    For research topics, like the series on evolution, my sources will all be cited, and I will do it at the beginning and no time after. If you want page numbers read the sources yourself.

    This is my choice on how I want to conduct this blog. I choose to do this because I got tired of fighting about who'se source was more trustworthy depending on your predetermind point of view very early on, ad I find thatthe debate actually stays on the actual topic this way. Put simply, it is to prevent the very same idiotic quibbling over minutae that you have complained about in this very debate.

    For example, you have made it rather apparrent that you do not trust the book "Icons of Evolution", and I would guess that you will autmatically discount any information that is contained withiin it despite the fact that it is a meticulously reesearched, honest book written by an actual scientist with the help of various bilogists. You will probably have similar attitudes about Darwin's Black box, Science of God, Genesis and the Big Bang, and every other book that criticizes evolution. I wonder how you reconcile the differences between what Darwin wrote in The Origin of the Species and what science is currently proving, spefically in the realms of genetics, paleontology, embryology, and physics. Don't wory, one of my sources for that series IS Darwin. Wht kind of sloppy researcher would I be without going straight to the source?

    Still trying to find those missing books though. Dang that move.

    By Blogger Daniel Levesque, at 7:18 PM  

  • Daniel: This is my choice on how I want to conduct this blog.

    That’s fine. I understand. These are just your opinions. Opinions can be correct if they are backed up by sound evidence, but without it, they are worthless.

    Daniel: you do not trust the book "Icons of Evolution", and I would guess that you will autmatically discount any information that is contained withiin it

    I certainly don’t trust it, but you can be sure that I will not automatically discount anything. I will discount something if it is shown to be incorrect, but unlike you, I will not automatically believe something unless it is supported by sound evidence. And yes, I will be suspicious of any information coming from other books written by Christian apologetics. Past experience has shown me that they will distort the truth in an effort to protect their irrational beliefs.

    Daniel: I wonder how you reconcile the differences between what Darwin wrote in The Origin of the Species and what science is currently proving, spefically in the realms of genetics, paleontology, embryology, and physics.

    What an incredibly strange remark. This may be due to your mindset as a Biblical literalist, but you appear to be seeing the theory of evolution as a religion with Darwin as its god. Darwin was just a man—a scientist—who got some things right and others wrong. Science isn’t a dogma like religion; it corrects itself as new information comes to light and it never asserts that it has the final answer to any question. In science, nothing is ever proven and nothing is taken as gospel, but that doesn’t mean that we can’t trust what it shows us about the natural world. There are some things—such as the theory of evolution—that are supported by such overwhelming evidence that they are considered to be facts. No doubt we’ll discuss this further when you begin your series.

    Daniel: Don't wory, one of my sources for that series IS Darwin. Wht kind of sloppy researcher would I be without going straight to the source?

    You should remember that this source is 150 years out of date and much has been learned since then. Think carefully before using anything Darwin said as evidence against the current theory of evolution.

    By Anonymous cjb, at 11:58 PM  

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